Diane, This Is What Dale Cooper Looks Like Now

Kyle MacLachlan reprises his role as FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper in Twin Peaks, the 18-part continuation of the original series starting Sunday, May 21, at 9 p.m. on Showtime.

Okay, here’s where it gets complicated: The series debuts with a two-parter, followed by episodes three and four the following weekend. and then going to one-hour installments from then on. However, immediately following the May 21 premiere, Showtime Anytime and Showtime On Demand will offer parts three and four.

Well, I guess we shouldn’t expect just any old broadcast format from David Lynch

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TWIN PEAKS Revival: There Will Be Donuts

Showtime still has not set a premiere date for its revival of TWIN PEAKS, but it did release a little teaser that assures fans that the new miniseries will  maintain the spirit of the original.

Check out series co-creator and director David Lynch reprising his role as FBI Regional Bureau Chief Gordon Cole…

Why is the entire promo just Lynch eating a donut?

Because f*ck you — that’s why!

It’s David Lynch and it’s TWIN PEAKS and it’s pure genius, so deal with it.

TWIN PEAKS Gets Official Green Light at Showtime

A sequel series to TWIN PEAKS, one of the greatest-yet-flawed TV serials of all time, has officially been approved by premium cable network Showtime. It will be set in the present and continue the original storyline 20 years later.

All nine episodes will be written by original creators David Lynch and Mark Frost, with Lynch directing each installment. There is no word on casting, but it would hard to imagine to any sequel without Kyle MacLachlan‘s Special Agent Dale Cooper. And Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee) did promise Dale she would see him again in 25 years (2015 will mark 25 years since the series debuted) back when he visited the Black Lodge:

The revival will go into production soon and premiere in 2016.

Visit M. Night Shyamalan’s WAYWARD PINES

It would be difficult to spawn more TWIN PEAKS comparisons than Fox’s new WAYWARD PINES does with this initial trailer. From the strangely quaint town full of colorful characters to the federal agent in way over his head to the star-studded cast, WAYWARD PINES is just begging to be measured against David Lynch’s seminal weird series.

About the only thing that will distract from the allusions to the adventures of Special Agent Dale Cooper in the great Pacific Northwest is the presence of creator/producer M. Night Shyamalan – the onetime cinematic wunderkind-turned-cliché-turned-Hollywood punch line. Everyone is trained to expect the “unexpected” from Shyamalan, so his greatest achievement here would be to get anything past the audience.

I’m calling it right now: This series will be overwhelmed by fan arguments over whether lead character Ethan is dead or not. I can almost see Twitter the next morning; and it won’t be pretty. Beyond TWIN PEAKS, this series also appears to borrow heavily from Shyamalan’s 2004 movie The Village, doesn’t it?  And how about that PRISONER vibe?

WAYWARD PINES is being held until 2015 on Fox.

BROADCHURCH Should Have Broad Appeal in USA

broadchurch1I quite enjoyed last night’s premiere of BROADCHURCH on BBC America, but I definitely didn’t see anything that was very “new” or “groundbreaking” — which is the way the series is being sold. BROADCHURCH is a police procedural about the murder of an 11-year-old boy in a British seaside town, and how the killing affects everyone in town.

Perhaps its storytelling is new for a series in the UK, but BROADCHURCH reminded me instantly of TWIN PEAKS, but without the supernatural elements: the death of a child shakes a small town to its core. I expect future installments to reveal the dead boy Danny was involved in a secret conspiracy that affects a lot of adults in town and reaches into the local school — just like Laura Palmer’s situation.  It’s even mimicking the law-enforcement dynamic: the local cop who knows everyone in town teamed with the eccentric “expert” from somewhere else.
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HAPPY TOWN 1.1: Are you happy now, ABC?

Unless you have been avoiding ABC programming entirely for the past few months, you are doubtless aware that the network had a new crime series, HAPPY TOWN, debuting this week. This question is: Was it worth the saturation promotion and megahype?

Well, not really. HAPPY TOWN is enjoyable enough, but in no way is it groundbreaking appointment television. The bizarre serial-kidnapper whodunit invites – make that begs – comparison to TWIN PEAKS by openly aping the iconic series with everything from its rustic small town to its quirky residents to a sheriff investigating a bizarre murder. In this case, the victim has a railroad spike driven into his head, resulting in a hole that goes clean through his skull, allowing sunlight to shine through. While somewhat novel for network TV, this is no Laura Palmer, the homecoming queen “wrapped in plastic.”
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