Your First Look at Sophie Turner as Phoenix

The next installment in the long-running X-Men series, X-Men: Dark Phoenix will see the mutant heroes battling one of their own, telepath Jean Grey, when she is driven mad after being possessed by the Phoenix, an entity of nearly unlimited power.

Entertainment Weekly has the first images from next fall’s big movie, depicting star Sophie Turner (Sansa, GAME OF THRONES) as Phoenix. When she turns evil, she becomes known as Dark Phoenix.

According to director Simon Kinberg, the Phoenix force is awakened after a solar flare hits the team during a mission in space. First-time helmer Kinberg wrote and produced a number of previous X-flicks.

Here are EW‘s three exclusive images from the movie:

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‘The New Mutants’ Film Scares Up its First Poster

This spring will see the debut of a new group of superheroes who are mutants, but not part of the X-Men, and their movie aims to be nothing like the complicated long-running franchise featuring their elders.

Today’s release of the creepy first poster for The New Mutants confirms that director Josh Boone is going all-in on something totally new: a superhero horror movie.

“We are making a full-fledged horror movie set within the X-Men universe,” Boone (The Fault in our Stars) said. “There are no costumes. There are no supervillains. We’re trying to do something very, very different.”

Debuting back in the 1980s, The New Mutants (created by writer Chris Claremont and artist Bob McLeod)  comic book series featured a handful of youngsters gathered by X-Men mentor Professor Xavier, who intended to teach them how to control their powers, but not for the purpose of being superheroes. However, events conspired to force the fledgling team into battle.
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Ready for Another Revamp of Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman?

Reboots, relaunches and reimaginings are all the rage at Marvel and DC, each of which seems to change the origins, powers and even universes of its superheroes on a near-monthly basis. And now, DC Comics brings us something a little… different. Yes, it’s a reimagining of their core Trinity — Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman — but it’s going to be Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman as you’ve never seen them before.

Meet Milkman Man, Father Bruce and Wonder Wife, the Wholesome Trinity, courtesy of five one-shot issues from DC’s Young Animal imprint, beginning in January. In “Milk Wars,” DC’s regular Justice League and Doom Patrol take on strange doppelgangers created by RetCo, an interdimensional corporation that repackages reality by rewriting it as stories” for its clients.

Milkman Man is an even more upright, uptight version of Superman. Father Bruce has dedicated his life to orphans, while Wonder Wife is a Stepford Wives’ nightmare of a stereotypical 1950s housewife.

“Milk Wars,” which will last only about a month, kicks off with JLA/Doom Patrol Special #1, by Steve Orlando, Gerard Way, ACO, Magdalene Visaggio and Sonny Liew, which will be released on Jan. 31, 2018.

The Secret Origin of Keyser Soze Revealed!

keyser_soze_1041582_1044Remember The Usual Suspects, with its villainous mastermind, the mysterious international criminal, Keyser Soze? Of course you do; the film featured one of the most spectacular twist endings in movie history!

Ever wanted to know  more about how Keyser Soze got his start than was revealed in the movie?

Too bad! Red 5 Comics is going to fill in the story anyway, in a comic book series called Keyser Soze: Scorched Earth, which is billed as “the official origin” of the character.

Set nine years before 1995’s The Usual Suspects, the comic series will tell the story of how the young(er) Keyser Soze carved out his drug empire in the bad old days of President Ronald Reagan‘s War on Drugs.

There is no word on whether the comic has the rights to Kevin Spacey‘s likeness.

The comic will debut on Free Comic Book Day, which is on May 6, 2017.

 

Fun Variant Covers for ‘Doctor Who’ Comic Books

Titan Comics will be releasing some oddball (in a good way) variant covers for its various officially licensed Doctor Who comics shipping in January and February, drawn by an artist who goes by the name Question No. 6.

The titles are:

DOCTOR WHO: TENTH DOCTOR #2.6
In stores Jan. 13
Cover C by Question No. 6

DOCTOR WHO: ELEVENTH DOCTOR #2.6
In stores Feb. 3
Cover C by Question No. 6

DOCTOR WHO: TWELFTH DOCTOR #2.2
In stores Jan. 13
Cover D by Question No. 6

The Fourth Doctor Returns — to Comic Books!

The Fourth Doctor returns to comics with his greatest companion, the intrepid Sarah Jane Smith, in an all-new five-part miniseries from Titan Comics, Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor.

Set in Victorian England, “Gaze of the Medusa” is written by Gordon Rennie & Emma Beeby and illustrated by Brian Williamson. According to the synopsis: “A mysterious woman commands a hidden army in a house of the blind. Scryclops stalk the streets… and something alien and terrible screams from prehistory — with a hunger that cannot be satisfied!”

Tom Baker played the Fourth Doctor onscreen from 1974-’81, while Sarah Jane was portrayed by the late Elisabeth Sladen.

Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor #1 will be released in March 2016.

James Bond is Back — in His Own Comic Book Series!

The latest James Bond movie starring Daniel Craig, SPECTRE, opens in the USA on Friday, and today 007 returns to comics for the first time in decades with the release of Dynamite Entertainment‘s  James Bond 007 #1 by Warren Ellis and Jason Masters (Wolverines and Batwoman).

Ellis has penned an original story based on the character as depicted in Ian Fleming’s original books, not the very different character who evolved on the movie screen. The first story arc sees Bond investigating a mysterious organization behind a new drug hitting the streets — an investigation that has already seen the death of agent 008.

Ellis had a few interesting things to say to website i09 about the new series:

“This is the Ian Fleming Bond—the Bond of the books, a direct commission from Dynamite Comics and the Ian Fleming literary estate. The single real difference is that I’ve set it in the present day, having expressed that preference to the estate because I didn’t want to do period pastiche. Beyond that, you should consider it as taking place somewhere in the last half of the Fleming canon.”


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