Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)

Captain America: The First Avenger outranks every other superhero film released this summer, joining Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 as the elite genre movies of 2011.  It is a rollicking adventure yarn; the kind they used to make all the time.

The film benefits immeasurably from its World War II-era, old-fashioned good guys vs. bad guys simplicity, which paints Cap as a hero for whom we can all cheer, up against villains everyone can hiss. Director Joe Johnston (The Rocketeer) takes the time to sketch in Steve Rogers’ character and establish him as a paragon long before he takes up that symbolic shield to defend the free world against the worst of the worst: the Red Skull and Hydra, a renegade branch of even more evil Nazis.

Captain America:The First Avenger tells the story of Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) a 4-F runt desperate to fight the Nazis in Europe. Impressed by the youngster’s pluck, German refugee Dr. Abraham Erskine (Stanley Tucci) enrolls Rogers in a secret scientific program to create a “super-soldier” to win the war. Erskine’s secret serum transforms the puny Rogers into the ultimate physical specimen, a strapping guy gifted with superhuman strength, endurance and healing powers. But no sooner is the experiment a success than an Axis agent murders Erskine, and the secret to creating more super-soldiers dies with him. Rogers is detailed to the PR circuit to sell war bonds, but when his best friend is captured by the Nazis, Rogers parachutes behind enemy lines to rescue him – and 400 other prisoners – and then takes his place as a true super-soldier.

But the Nazis have a scientific program of their own, dubbed Hydra, run by Johann Schmidt (Hugo Weaving), who was himself a test subject of Erskine’s who received an earlier version of the super-soldier serum with less beneficent results: his face was left disfigured, earning him the moniker “Red Skull.” The Skull’s attention is on a strange device of incalculable power he calls a tesseract (fans of the Thor movie might recognize it as the Casket of Ancient Winters from Odin’s treasure room) which he uses to create energy weapons for use against the Allies. But not if Cap has anything to say about it!

The entire enterprise is anchored to Evans’ Captain America, who blazes through the film as a beacon of hope. Cap is not an afterthought in his own movie, overshadowed by a lurid villain the way Batman so often is. Cap is a Hero, a man who always does what’s right because…well, it’s the right thing to do. But Cap is not insufferable because Evans plays him as utterly sincere. With Evans’ square jaw and blond hair, both Rogers and Cap are noble do-gooders, and it never feels campy because Evans resists the urge to overplay or wink at the camera. If even a single scintilla of Evans’ cocky Human Torch persona from the Fantastic Four movies had leaked through, Cap would have been toast as a character. But Evans is masterful as the hero who stands up to the self-declared “master race.” Perhaps it helps that Cap is fighting Nazis – seemingly the only group left in today’s world that is universally despised; there is no doubt that he is fighting the good fight, and that every ratzi he kills (and they are legion) deserves it. Cap saves countless soldiers while dispatching the baddies.

The movie gets everything about Rogers and Cap right: He is brave and compassionate, and hates bullies, no matter who they are. Erskine said he chose Rogers because a weak man knows the value of strength. Well, Rogers believes in himself, and he believes in America with an earnestness that qualifies him to wear the flag as a costume. The moment that best illustrates Rogers’ right to become Captain America came when he leaped on the grenade during the training exercise to save his fellow trainees. Bravery and self-sacrifice are two of Cap’s hallmarks, as indelible as his red-white-and-blue costume and indestructible shield. The movie costume is a workable distillation of uniform he wears in the Ultimate Captain America comic books, and the shield is spot-on. There are even nods to minor bits of Cap lore from over the years, such as Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell), the unnamed-but-recognizable “Howling Commandos” Cap liberates from the Skull’s prison camp, Rogers’ artistic tendencies, and even the famous cover of 1941’s Captain America Comics #1, which depicts Cap socking Hitler in the jaw!

However, the flick does take some pretty serious liberties with James “Bucky” Barnes (Sebastian Stan), who served as Cap’s costumed sidekick in the comics. The flick makes him older and alters the familiar beats of his story in ways that will shock fans of the comics. However, in the context of the movie, the changes work – and serve the positive function of keeping Cap buffs guessing. Along those same lines, the movie also drastically reimagines Cap’s experiences at the end of the war but, again, the alterations are fitting, and certainly in keeping with the spirit of Cap’s established story. On the other hand, Atwell’s British agent feels tacked-on, as if the producers suddenly realized they needed a female character and grafted her to the screenplay. But these are minor quibbles that do not ruin the overall enjoyment of the movie.

Especially not when there is a fun villain like the Skull. As the mutated Schmidt, Weaving is much livelier than his repressed Agent Smith from the Matrix trilogy, but he doesn’t go over-the-top with Nazi sadism. Weaving builds a rumbling sense of menace that makes him a very real threat even though the Skull’s appearance is unreal – thanks to fantastic makeup that accurately replicates the Skull’s hideous look in the comics.

In fact, the visual effects are very impressive overall – none more than the technology that erased parts of Evans’ hulking physique to make him look scrawny in the early stages of the movie. The world of the 1940s is recreated in all its old-timey grittiness without looking like a fake computer program.

Viewers should be sure to stay through the end credits and catch a bonus sequence that will have fans of Marvel movies salivating for next summer! But until then, Captain America: The First Avenger ranks as the best superhero film since 2008’s one-two punch of Iron Man and The Dark Knight.

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127 thoughts on “Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)

    • I always love it when a movie I’m really excited to see lives up to expectations, and I think Cap will meet yours. Enjoy! (I’m glad you liked the review. Thanks for reading!)

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    • I’m so glad the producers resisted any urge to update Cap’s origin story to some other war. As I mentioned, I think the WWII era had a great influence on the character, and Johnston and co. really pulled it off effectively. Awesome movie, indeed! Thanks for reading.

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  1. Saw the movie Saturday night. I’m not familiar with the comics so the movie is my introduction in to the background of C.A. I wasn’t too impressed with the film, which is a let down considering Marvel has been pretty good with their movie adaptation of their films for a while now. Am looking forward to avengers in 2012 however.

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    • I am looking forward to “The Avengers” next summer, for sure. I’ve always had faith in Joss Whedon, and now that we know how Marvel wants Cap to be handled onscreen, I think we’re in for a real treat.

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  2. Nice review! Although I liked the movie and agreed that it’s one of the best superhero movies I’ve seen in recent years, I almost think Thor was more fun. But maybe I like the Shakespearean drama between Loki, Thor and Odin. That, and The Avengers trailer sort of upstaged Captain America.

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed the review. There probably was more of a sense of free-wheeling fun in “Thor,” just because of the personality of the Thunder God, and, yes, there is the tragedy of the brothers and the All-Father. I wouldn’t say Cap got upstaged by the Avengers; I looked at it as a nice little kicker to send us out of our theaters and straight to our calendars.

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  3. Agree! The simplicity of ‘good vs evil’ and even the unapologetic nods to 1940’s patriotism made the movie a delight and an anomaly in our time- a time when the ‘complex and brooding hero’ has become (a rather tiresome, in my opinion) standard. Good review!

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    • Yes, it was fun to be able to stand and cheer for a Good Guy who hit the Bad Guys where it hurt. You can tell that Steve’s only regrets were for the G.I.s he couldn’t save. Leave the brooding to guys who hang out in caves…

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  4. Congrats on being FP! I just saw this movie over the weekend, and speaking as someone who’s been reading comics his whole life, this film did not disappoint. Your review is apt and entertaining. 🙂

    Keep up the good work!

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    • Thanks for the kind words about my review. I have been reading comics my whole life as well, and I was thankful that I wasn’t left cringing by any “improvements” the filmmakers felt compelled to add. Thanks for reading.

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    • Sounds like you and your husband definitely had a fun experience with Cap. (And I’m glad you ended up getting a bargain on “Thor”) I really think “The Avengers” is going to be the event we’re all hoping it wil be. All the pieces are in place… “Avengers Assemble!”

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  5. I’m looking forward to it because it goes back to the good ol’ days of Captain America, when Marvel actually cared about him. Today, in the comics, the image of Captain America has been horribly warped and used to make heavy-handed political statements. I just want to see the ol’ Cap get back to throwing his shield and winning one for the team.

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    • No doubt about it: “Captain America: The First Avenger” is a throwback (pun intended) to more traditional Cap sensibilities, which made the WWII setting so crucial.

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  6. Coming from someone, who can appreciate a well-done super hero movie like X-Men First Class (mostly thanks to the impeccable acting by the leads), I was super let-down by Capt. America. I fell asleep at the so-called “climax.” Nearly every shot had to exploit the 3-D element to the point that it felt contrived and stagey, taking me out of the story. Add to that the writing lacked any subtlety and the actors performing like cartoonish robots (except maybe Jones), and this was a big disappointment for me.

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    • Sorry you were disappointed in the flick and distracted by the 3D. I opted for the 2D version. I enjoyed “X-Men: First Class” far more than I thought I would, but I could also appreciate Cap. I thought Evans did a fine job, and while there wasn’t room for me to mention Tommy Lee Jones in my review, I thought he was great, too. Mr. Oscar Winner does not always get the laugh lines, so he made the most of it here.

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    • Thanks for the kind words about my review. And you’re right that the SFX were not overdone; they did what was needed to get the job done, and were subtle about it. I understand the FX folks had to tweak “skinny Steve” in about 250 shots!

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  7. I loved loved loved the movie. It is my favorite CBM of all time now… I love how they left his character humble and in tact. His heart never waivers… even with the hot blonde secretary… he was never comforatble there. Great movie!! Great review!

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    • One thing the super-soldier serum did not need to enhance was Steve Rogers’ heart. He was born a hero, and he remained one even after he gained powers. I’m so glad you enjoyed the review.

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    • This is one of those situations where, if you miss a little you miss a lot, Rayme! But don’t sweat it — just go back and see it again. Everyone I’ve spoken to agrees the brief coda was worth reading through the credits. 2012 can’t come soon enough!

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  8. Well after reading through your review I’m going to rethink opting out of seeing it. After the legion of superhero movies that have come out over the years, I’ve grown tired of them and figured that this would be just another one of those movies.

    From your review I can see that it’s different, and I have heard good things about it.

    Thanks for making a convert out of me!

    ❋ colouredbeauty
    http://colouredbeauty.wordpress.com

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    • Hey, glad to hear you’re considering giving the movie a try. I think what makes Captain America: The First Avenger so unique is that Steve wants to be a hero. He doesn’t spend the movie resisting and denying the costume; he embraces it. Steve Rogers is not a brooding sourpuss, he’s a hero!

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  9. Great review, I just saw Captain America yesterday. It was a good movie and I do love the 1940’s elements. It was a treat to see the cities in an old-fashioned way. My friend who I saw it with, pointed out it was refreshing to see a super hero who is generally nice and a good guy, not full of himself like other super heroes. It is good to see “good” characters when the norm is how many chicks can I get and I’m so great just being me.

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  10. As a long standing comic book fan (especially Marvell), I’ve been sort had an on and off again relationship with the string of superhero films of the last decade. Batman, Spider-Man and Iron Man kept me happy while I found myself feeling sort of awful after watching Thor, Daredevil, Ghost Rider, Wolverine and Fantastic Four. I didn’t like them. Even the X-Men films couldn’t hold my interest as they went on. I would get momentarily excited before being let down hard. If I had to review each of the Marvel films made since 2000, a lot of them would be one sentence long:

    “I didn’t entirely enjoy it because something just doesn’t feel right.”

    I remember intentionally avoiding the newest Punisher film specifically because I thought the previous film hadn’t understood the character enough. All of the previous films were just awful so I was already convinced the reboot would be terrible. But I’m not even outraged anymore, I’m expecting them to be bad.

    Captain America is among my all time favorite heros and, until I read your review, I hadn’t planned on seeing the film ever. I was just too worried that I’d go and feel like another one of my heros had been ruined by Hollywood yet again. Perhaps it’s the lesser known characters that yield the worst movies. The more the film tries to explain or needs to create for you to understand the most basic plot points takes away everything interesting. Maybe that’s why the more established and better known heros tend to have better films. Then again, maybe it’s just because nobody wants to be the director that ruined American’s Greatest Champion.

    Thank you for getting me excited about these movies again.

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    • I can honestly say that you don’t have to worry about Cap being “ruined” by this movie. I believe the filmmakers accurately captured the spirit of what Captain America is about. I know a lot of movie producers blather about being true to what the comic creators intended, but I see it on the screen in “Captain America: The First Avenger.” As I noted, there are some deviations from the standard narrative, especially relating to Bucky, but considering everything that has happened to Barnes in the comic lately, this is minor. And the details of getting Cap to the present day are different, but it’s in the same vein. I sensed that Joe Johnston respected the source material.

      I hope the film meets your expectations (especially now that I’ve whetted your appetite)

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  11. Excellently put my good sir. We seem to have an agreeable opinion of the film. I certainly hope you’ll check out my review of the film and partake in some discussion.

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    • Thanks, Amber, I really appreciate your support for my review! Seeing “Captain America: The First Avenger” in the theater is definitely the way to go!

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  12. Honestly I don’t care for Captain America and 99% of you ADD a**h*les will make it only to this sentence. Anyway your post made interested in actually watching this movie. I wonder what kind of bonus is at the end of the movie…

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  13. I saw Captain America the night before last. The theater was packed. I was lucky for my brother, his friend, my dad, and I to all get seats! I was really surprised how many people were there. I’m unsure whether I liked this better than Green Lantern, but they both blow Christian Bale out of hunky material waters. This was a very good review about the movie, although I disagree when you say the brunette female (Christ, I can’t remember her name) was added in as an after thought. I thought she was brilliant. There were a couple parts that were cry-able: when Bucky was killed and when I thought Captain America was going to die and instead was asleep for seventy years. Jeez, he’s definitely going to be technologically impaired. Of course, that would be a pretty funny storyline watching him try to use a Macintosh; Tony Stark would have to help him in The Avengers. Anyway, great review! It always makes me happy when critics give fair reviews for good films.

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    • I believe Hayley Atwell did a fine job as Peggy Carter, I just meant that the character did not have a whole heck of a lot to do, and there was no real reason why the U.K. adviser had to be a woman. I was hoping she would have more significance, especially given the key role her descendant(s) plays in Cap mythology.

      If anyone can get Steve up to speed on technology, it’s Tony Stark!

      Glad you liked the review. I always try to be fair, whether I love the movie or not.

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    • You should be delighted with the work Hayley does — Peggy doesn’t sit back and let the boys have all the fun — I just wish there had been room to let her do a little more. Glad you liked the review.

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    • I saw this movie in the company of two 11-year-olds and a 7-year-old. They liked it overall, but thought the early parts (focusing on Steve Rogers) were a bit too talky. A 12-year-old would probably handle that better. They loved Cap in action!

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  14. Your review was pretty spot on – I went yesterday in the company of a 13 and two 7 year olds. The twins were quiet throughout the movie, which means to me it was great!

    The only thing was that we saw HP the day before and in the kids eyes, Captain America was a lessor movie comparatively.

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    • Glad the kids had fun. I wonder if maybe they were more familiar with Harry Potter after seeing his other movies or reading the books?

      Perhaps the Cap movie will stimulate an interest in reading comics, similar to the way HP flicks funneled kids to the original books.

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  15. I must admit that I have not seen this film as of yet, I’m sure that I will, but I also think that I’m kind of starting to burn out on the comic book film genre. I just wonder what will be next?

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  16. I really enjoyed the movie as well. Wasn’t as familiar with the comic storyline, but was very impressed and pleased with the film over all. I thought the acting was superb, especially in the case of Stanley Tucci—Tommy Lee Jones is of course always brilliant, and I was happy with what Evans brought to the film. I too am glad that the film took place during the war, I don’t think they could have recreated that kind of national pride and attempt at pure heroism in a modern setting.

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  17. i didn’t think peggy carter felt tacked on; its pretty hard to make this kind of old fashioned movie without a love interest, and her character is well established in Captain America lore.

    I am really shocked that the movie is only at 74% on rotten tomatoes – and even more shocked that Harry Potter is at 96%!

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    • You are absolutely correct that a love interest is vital to an old-fashioned movie like this one. I guess I was letting my modern self look askance at the fact that Peggy seemed to be following Steve around just to moon at him. One of the things I loved was that she let him drop behind enemy lines without insisting that she enter the camp herself, like a modern film would depict.

      Yes, Peggy’s place in Cap lore is secure. I am guessing the Avengers movie will make Sharon into Peggy’s granddaughter or even great-granddaughter instead of sister or niece…

      Cap’s Rotten Tomatoes score is surprising. I wonder if folks who were put off by the abruptness of the ending are punishing the film? Not fair.

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  18. great review 🙂 although I’m not a big Cap America fan, I do know a bit of his mythos and have seen episodes of the animated series on TV when I was a kid. I’m so looking forward to Evans’s portrayal of the first avenger. 🙂

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  19. I love the movie. We (a friend and two nieces) were at the theater to see Harry Potter for the second time, and when we came out, there was a big line for Captain America, this was at 7:00. The kinds never had seen a movie at 12:00. So we went back, did not do the line thing. But got great seats. Glad we did, I love it, It has been a long time since I like a super hero movie. The movie kind of remained me of Indiana Jones at times, and the we though it was funny too.

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    • Midnight screenings can be a lot of fun, if the audience is really into the show.

      It didn’t really occur to me at the time, but I can see the “Indiana Jones” parallels: Nazis, a hidden artifact of great power, a square-jawed hero, chases, gunfire, explosions..

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      • It was fun, people who show at midnight are fans, it was funny after the movie ended no body got up, they knew something was going to come up. When it finished everyone was clapping and shearing. Did not get any sleep, but I had fun. Will follow the blog.

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  20. Pingback: https://joediliberto.wordpress.com/2011/07/25/captain-america-the-first-avenger/ « FANBOY THEATRE – FAN FILM NEWS & REVIEWS

  21. Joe..excellent review…and a good point about Cap not being overshadowed by the villain as happens so often in the Marvel universe film adaptations……..I still rate X-Men: First Class slightly higher…but Captain America is a solid Marvel adaptation.

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    • Agreed, Chris. X-Men: First Class was the best superhero movie of the summer. It deserved much better at the box office.

      Captain America was very good, too. I was pleasantly surprised with Chris Evans’ performance and the script. Looking forward to a sequel, or two.

      Oh, and The Avengers trailer has me stoked. Although, I think I am excited to see Hiddleston return as Loki more than anything. Thought he was great in Thor.

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  22. Super review! 🙂
    I promised my son and hubby they’d love this movie, but they were not excited to see it.
    However, it pleasantly surprised both of them! The theater was packed, and everyone was laughing and having fun, so it was a great time to be had by all.

    Hayley Atwell did a fine job with her role, but I, too, wish her role had been more developed. It was hard for me to believe a female would have that kind of position in WWII, but maybe so…

    The relationship between Bucky and Steve (Captain America) was terrific. They were the best of friends, more like brothers.

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    • Cool that Cap took your husband and son by surprise (so to speak). It’s great fun when the crowd is into a movie instead of gabbing on the phone and being rude.

      I attributed Peggy’s position of authority to her being attached to the science directorate.

      And Steve and Bucky’s friendship was nice. I guess since Bucky didn’t get to don his own costume and fight alongside Cap, the filmmakers decided to play up his ties to Steve.

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  23. Great review. I wondered if it would’ve been better if Samuel Jackson was in the movie a bit earlier. Loved Captain America and I can’t wait for the next sequel.

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    • I kept searching for Sgt. Fury among the Howling Commandos, but alas… I was also on the edge of my seat, waiting to see if Gabe Jones would be allowed to blow his horn.

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  24. Hey Joe,

    You do a good recap/review of the movie, but I got to say that I disagree with your depiction of Caption America as an elite movie. I saw it last night with a couple of friends and we all walked out of there thinking the same thing…it was one giant advertisement. I understand that its a movie about Capt. America and that entails a certain level of American patriotism, but I can’t remember the last time that a movie so shamelessly pushed ‘America’ on it’s audience. At least when Team America did it, the joke was out in the open. That factor combined with the cheesy and cornball lines throughout make me give it two thumbs down. Streamable, but definitely not worth the penny in theaters.

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    • Clearly we saw the movie from opposing viewpoints. I’m having trouble seeing how someone could view the movie as an “advertisement” for America, since the opposing viewpoint in the film was represented by the Red Skull and his fascists. I don’t think anyone was on Schmidt’s side.

      We’ll have to agree to disagree on this one…

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  25. Thanks Joe for a very entertaining and perceptive review. Good of you to mention The Cube’s connection to the last Marvel flick, “Thor,” and you’re definitely right that Cap is not an afterthought in his own movie. What is so impressive about this movie is the overall quality and that’s thanks to the director of one of the greatest superhero movies ever, the writing team and the actors. You’re so right that even a smirk from Evans would have wrecked the thing. No smirks here. You forgot to mention Tommy Lee Jones who gives a wonderfully understated performance while being as larger than life as he is. Overall, a great review. I wrote one of the movie on my own blog here at WordPress which I hope you’ll get a chance to check out, just look thru my memos on Comic-Con to find it. Anyhow, my effort makes me appreciate yours all the more.

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    • I should have included a mention of Jones in my piece. Just as you describe him, he was larger-than-life while underplaying the role; quite a feat!

      I liked your review, and I’m glad you appreciate Joe Johnston’s work on “The Rocketeer.” That period piece is a very underrated gem.

      Thanks for reading my review.

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  26. Enjoyed the movie, it was a welcome relief from the Potter fever that seems to be sweeping the nation. I do have to throw in a minor complaint that they cast Chris Evans, though. I mean the guy got to play two super heroes in the same marvel universe which to me as a comic book fan is blasphemous. Give another actor a chance to shine. The same goes with Ryan Reynolds playing both the Green Lantern and (a horrible screen version of) Deadpool in X-Men Origins. Make every superhero a different person please, it just seems like the right thing to do.

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    • It may seem like Evans is hogging the action, but it’s hard to argue with the results. He was great as cocky Johnny Storm, but really owned Steve Rogers. In my book, he was a better Cap. As for Reynolds, I hated Deadpool (and the whole “Wolverine” movie) and really did not enjoy “Green Lantern,” although that wasn’t really his fault. Considering how hard it is to get work in Hollywood, Evans and Reynolds should step back and let some other folks in on the action.

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    • The movie Marvel universe diverges from the comics continuity in a couple of ways. It is my understanding that in movie continuity, the Casket of Ancient Winters becomes known as the Cosmic Cube in modern times. (Look for the tesseract to be called CC in “The Avengers.”) This is in keeping with reimagining the Asgardians as scientifically advanced aliens.

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  27. I just saw this tonight and it was so amazing. I was dissecting the underlying themes the entire movie. I haven’t seen a hero movie with such a human character before I saw this. A hero that makes mistakes and isn’t a one man show… it’s real and it’s relate-able. And that’s what makes it good.

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  28. Tarantino? That’s an interesting idea. I would hazard to guess that “Quentin Tarantino’s Captain America” would have a sensibility that ranks somewhere between “Inglorious Basterds” and an old-fashioned war movie.

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  29. This movie was absolutely fantastic. I have been a Chris Evans fan since Not Another Teen Movie but was skeptical he could play this role. I was pleasantly surprised though when I found out he can as he did a great job. I always loved the Captain America character even though I never read a comic book of his. Anyone who watches this movie won’t be disappointed as it does not go over the top in any aspect (including action). And in my opinion it is the best superhero movie to come out in the 2000’s.

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  30. Sounds great – I’m glad they made it a period piece (my comic book fandom is based around DC rather than Marvel, and I’d love to see their ‘Golden Agers’ on the big screen). The review seems to nail exactly what makes a superhero movie work – sincerity. Christopher Reeve, Nolan’s Batman, Marvel’s recent stuff… They all embrace the character rather than act embarassed about them and that’s why they work. Glad to see Chris Evans is taking the same approach.

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    • As a Golden Age DC fan, you should feel right at home watching “Captain America: The First Avenger.” I would not have been surprised to see the JSA show up during the scene when Steve was chasing the Axis spy through the streets of Brooklyn. Too bad there wasn’t time for the Invaders to make an appearance — although, keep your eyes open for an Invaders “Easter egg” early in the movie.

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  31. I can’t wait to see Captain America! It will be amazing — especially in the run up to the Avengers film next year 🙂

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  32. I really enjoyed your review, it’s made me even more excited about watching this movie, since it doesn’t come out in England till the 29th of July. I’m glad to hear that this movie is in canon with the comics – though I’m slightly dissapointed that Bucky isn’t a kid. But I hope that I love this movie!
    P.S. I subscribed to your blog.

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    • Thanks for reading my review (and subscribing). I guess we have to expect that things will be changed for the screen, however it’s important to note that for the role Bucky plays in the screen story, he has to be older, and aging him works in context.

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  33. I don’t find Chris Evans entertaining in the slightest. I wouldn’t even consider him an actor. I feel like the reason most women like watching his movies is solely because of his body and that’s just sad. I wonder if this film would be a let down because of that. Hmm…

    You gave me something to consider anyway.

    marlowesnymph.wordpress.com

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    • Yes, I did notice the “Synthetic Man” bit! Clever way to acknowledge the Invaders, since the filmmakers couldn’t actually squeeze them into this movie.

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  34. i agree. i loved it, just saw it yesterday. i know a lot of ppl were skeptical about Evans playing Cap when he’s been Johnny Storm but the way i see it, as long as he does a great job, who cares? i can’t wait to see what they do w/ him in the Avengers and Cap sequel.

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  35. Looooking forward to wacth this movie! By the way, im from Malaysia. I love cap since the 80’s. As far as i remembered, the Cap’s show during that time was meant for tV. He(normal guy) had the motorbike accident (skeeding) and neeed for surgery (turn him into Captain America). Thanks for the great review.

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    • I’m sure the makers of “Green Lantern” did not set out to make a dud, but that’s certainly what they ended up with. I think it was because they got Hal Jordan completely wrong. The makers of “Captain America: The First Avenger,” however, got Steve Rogers exactly right, and he’s the perfect core around which to build a movie about a hero, not a cynical dude.

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  36. I may just be being nit picky, but most of the first half I really didn’t like. From when he got his powers to the action scene on the train was extremely campy. And what in the world was up with that montage? I swear that was the worst montage I’ve ever seen!

    The movie was certainly not all bad though. Before he gets his powers was excellent, and toward the middle, you know the action scene where they try to ambush the train? From that point on it was the best movie i’d ever seen. My issue with the first half is that they ran it a little like they did Spider-Man. It just doesn’t work for C.A., he’s supposed to be an action packed superhero badass, it made all of the humor seem very forced and predictable.

    One more thing I had a big, big problem with. Overall the movie was extremely kid friendly, the guys get shot and turn into blue mist, it was great, and then it got to the part where he was fighting a nazi on the flying bomb. He kicks the nazi into the propeller and it shoots blood everywhere. I really didn’t like that. It made the little girls sitting behind me upset.

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  37. I think it’s sad that Captain America portrays the American military as integrated (as in, not segregated, as in men of many races fighting side by side) when in fact, WW2 was a shameful time in American history in that our military wasn’t integrated and Black soldiers had to fight doubly hard in order distinguish themselves.

    I’m also a little disappointed that Marvel has gotten rid of some Avengers and replaced them with others. I always liked The Scarlet Witch.

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  38. Pingback: Captain America: Kicking HYDRA’s ass since 1943 « Radu presents: The Movie-Photo Blog

  39. Pingback: Captain America: The First Avenger (2011) « She Reviews Everything

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