Soap Opera Weekly: Read at Joe’s 7/22/09

July 22, 2009
RESCUE ME’s Tommy Gavin has turned the corner from being merely a self-destructive guy who causes a lot of collateral damage to a self-destructive guy who takes others down with him. This week’s episode culminated in Tommy leading (most of) his family back to drinking. The extended clan had gathered to stage an intervention to make Tommy stop drinking, but he turned the tables in a big way. But the intervention was probably doomed from the moment it was decided to conduct it in a bar. (Good thinking, Maggie!) Defrocked Mickey was able to keep the faith and resist the lure of the demon booze, but Tommy’s siren song got to everyone else. This episodes deft mix of the deadly serious and seriously childish — the subplot about Needles’ mail-order Russian bride was a juvenile as it was funny — just makes last week’s Emmy snubs all the more difficult to take. RESCUE ME totally deserved an outstanding drama nod, and Denis Leary should have been nominated in the lead actor category. At least Michael J. Fox landed his richly deserved guest-actor nomination. So it wasn’t a total washout.

It’s not in the same league, dramatically speaking, but I am liking Syfy’s new WAREHOUSE 13 more and more each week. Eddie McClintock and Joanne Kelly are fleshing out their characters with some fun quirks (ice skating helps Myka think; Pete is obsessed with cookies) and Saul Rubinek is getting a grip on exactly what kind of lovable eccentric Artie will be. I am especially impressed with the way Myka is proving to be a very vulnerable character, rather than the “tougher-than-any-man” stereotype of a fed. Her mixture of guilt and barely suppressed hostility dovetail nicely with Pete’s boyish enthusiasm.

Originally published on SoapOperaWeekly.com

Soap Opera Weekly: Read at Joe’s 7/16/09

I find it very intriguing that GENERAL HOSPITAL’s Olivia chose to tell Dante that she did not know who his father is. She could easily have told him his father died, but she didn’t. It feels to me like Liv deliberately left the door open in case she ever decided, at some future point, to let Dante in on the secret. If she had told her son that his father was dead, then she could not introduce him later without looking like a terrible liar. Of course, pretending to be clueless was a lie, as well, but Liv must have felt it was a lesser deception. Perhaps she simply could not bring herself to deny Sonny utterly — implying that she still carried a tiny torch for him. And what if that little spark gets fanned back to life?

It is entertaining to see Dante, masquerading as “Dominic,” interacting with Sonny, because we can see the similarities — Dante obviously inherited his big stones from daddy. And Sonny recognizes…something in Dom, but he just can’t place it. It will be fun to watch GH tease the revelation — will Olivia slip up? Will Dante need a blood transfusion for which Sonny is the only match? (Don’t laugh, that sort of thing happens to soap kids like clockwork!) Or will they never find out?

Originally published on SoapOperaWeekly.com

Soap Opera Weekly: Read at Joe’s 7/14/09

The farther it goes off the rails, the more I have been enjoying YOUNG AND RESTLESS. Currently, the major stories hinge on a guy who poked needles into his eyes to fake blindness and now is pretending to be gay; a guy who impersonated someone else for years; a fellow who faked his own death so he wouldn’t have to tell anyone he’s gay; and a hysterical pregnancy. Toss in that stuffed cat, and I have to wonder if anything is real on Y&R? Yesterday even gave us a phony OB-GYN packing a prerecorded ultrasound to help the not-pregnancy conspiracy along.

I like how recast Michael Muhney is playing Adam, especially the way he sometimes doesn’t look at people he’s speaking to, as if he lost sight of them. That’s a nice, subtle touch. And that little bit of business where he spotted Kitty had me laughing out loud. At least everybody on the show seems to be having fun with it. Y&R is just pretext piled upon pretense, and I’m loving it.

Originally published on SoapOperaWeekly.com